Why Eriksen may be forced to leave Inter

Robin Bairner
Christian Eriksen playing against Finland in Euro 2020

Christian Eriksen playing against Finland in Euro 2020

Christian Eriksen could be forced to leave Serie A club Inter following the cardiac arrest that he suffered playing for Denmark against Finland in Euro 2020 last Saturday.

While running to receive a throw in, Eriksen collapsed unconscious on the ground. It was later confirmed this was caused by a cardiac arrest.

Medics issued life-saving treatment after vital first aid from Denmark captain Simon Kjaer, and the 29-year-old playmaker appears to be making a strong recovery.

Although Eriksen is in good spirits, there are doubts over whether his footballing career will be able to continue.

Eriksen could be forced to leave Inter

Christian Eriksen, Denmark, collapses during Finland match

Following his cardiac arrest, it was confirmed on Thursday that Eriksen will have an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) fitted.

This could be permanent or temporary measure. If it is permanent, however, Eriksen will be unable to continue his career in Italy.

It is forbidden to play professional contact sport with such a device fitted, as per the Cardiological Organizational Committee for Sports Fitness protocol, which was updated in 2017.

With the Italian legislation, I doubt that he will be able to take the field again in Italy
- Lucio Mos, president of the Italian Society of Sports Cardiology

Lucio Mos, president of the Italian Society of Sports Cardiology, told Radio Punto Nuovo: “With the Italian legislation, I doubt that he will be able to take the field again in Italy. The current protocols are strict and we will no propose any changes to the one laid out by the Italian FA.”

Eriksen could, however, return in another country. Daley Blind, for example, plays with an ICD fitted for Ajax and the Netherlands.

Mos, though, says this should be reviewed.

“The European legislation is wider than ours but should be changed,” he said.

What is an ICD?

Eriksen will be fitted with an ICD, which is a small device which can treat people with dangerously abnormal heart rhythms.

According to the British Heart Foundation: “An ICD is placed under the skin, usually in the space just below the collar bone (clavicle) to monitor your heart rate. Thin wires connect the ICD to the heart, where it's always checking your heart rate and rhythm. It monitors your heart rhythm through the electrodes.”

If the heart rhythm is considered to be dangerous, it can carry out a number of treatments in an effort to solve the problem.